Teen Intensives Behind-The-Scenes: Lights and Sound

lights
We interviewed Jon Brophy, the advisor for the light crew.

1.) What is your favorite part of working on lights?
My favorite part of being a lighting designer is the collaboration. Lighting is not a stand alone art form for me, it’s part of a large scale project that requires all aspects working in unison to implement successfully. It’s my job to provide a bridge that allows the audience to take that one final step into the fictional world we are creating. Working together, we can create full sensory experiences that tell amazing stories.

2.) How do you keep track of all the lighting cues?
Paperwork. Lots of paperwork.

3.) How do you show the mood of a scene through the lights?
Trade secret? No, every designer will have their own methods of manipulating the mood of a scene, it’s all in the brushes that you use on the characters. I won’t tell you specifically how I do it, as it’s such a long answer I could write a small book on it, and for a small fee, you can buy many such books already published.

A soundboard.

A soundboard.

——-

We also interviewed Austin Hamilton, the advisor for the sound crew.

1.) What is the best part of working on sound?
I would say the best part is the feeling of having a show go well, when everyone, the audience, cast, and staff, are happy.

2.) What is it like working with microphones?
The mics for Theater are a little trickier than what you would use for music/bands. They tend to feedback easier, so they can be more challenging to work with.

3.) What do you do if they stop functioning properly during a show?
I would send a tech assistant to go down and see what the problem is. Most of the time it’s something simple like batteries running out, or a cable coming loose.

4.) How do you show the mood of a scene through sound?
There are a couple ways to accomplish this, one is through the music that is used to score the scene.

Another is compression, which is slightly more technical. Basically it allows you to automatically turn a person’s voice down and up. It makes it so it’s possible to have an actor yelling into their mic without tearing the audience’s head off, while still maintaining the impact of the yelling. You can also do the opposite, have an actor whisper but have it come through the speakers at a volume that is easy to hear while still having it sound like a whisper.

——-

This post was written by the Youth Repertory Company who will be performing as well as running the marketing, designing, costuming, and front of house for the Teen Summer Performance Intensives of Sweeney Todd: School Edition and William Shakespeare’s Titus Andronicus.

SWEENEY TODD: SCHOOL EDITION

When: August 14 & 21 @ 7pm | August 16 & 23 @ 2pm
Where: Duluth Playhouse
Tickets: Adults – $17 | Youth/Students – $14
Purchase: Online, call 218.733.7555, or stop by the Box Office located in the Duluth Depot building

TITUS ANDRONICUS

When: August 13, 15, 20, and 22 @ 7pm
Where: Duluth Playhouse
Tickets: Adults – $17 | Youth/Students – $14
Purchase: Online, call 218.733.7555, or stop by the Box Office located in the Duluth Depot building

Advertisements

Share your thoughts!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s